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BRIEF HISTORY GENERAL INFORMATION ARRIVAL PRACTICAL INFORMATION

In 1248 the Lubeck law was mentioned for the first time in connection with Tallinn. The Danish king granted the Tallinners all the rights held by citizens of Lubeck in a document which remained the basis of the city organisation up until the late 19th century.
In 1285 Tallinn became a member of the Hanseatic League. The city now received two names, two coats of arms, and two flags.
By 1346 when Denmark sold Northern Estonia to Germans, Tallinn was flourishing as a marketplace for traders.

Tallinn's golden age: from the 14th to the mid-16th century
The medieval Tallinn flourished from the 14th to the mid-16th century as a member of the powerful Hanseatic League. Tallinn's importance for the League rested on its strategic position as a port town on the trading route between Western Europe and Russia. Tallinn acts as a crossroads between East and West also today.
During this time Tallinn was one of the biggest towns in Northern Europe. The population grew up to 7,000-8,000 by the end of this period. Tallinn with its 66 defence towers belonged among the most powerful fortified towns in Northern Europe.
 
     

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