digital.tallinn

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BRIEF HISTORY GENERAL INFORMATION ARRIVAL PRACTICAL INFORMATION

The Tsarist Times: 1710-1917
Tallinn capitulated to Russian forces in 1710 as a result of the Northern War. Tsar Peter I guaranteed Tallinn a fair amount of autonomy within Tsarist Russia, whereas the local control over cultural and economy spheres was retained by the Baltic-German aristocracy.
Local government, civil and criminal laws, the court and school system, the Lutheran church and the conducting of official affairs in the German language was preserved.
The best part of the Tsarist Russian legacy in Tallinn can be seen in architecture. Baroque palace and park in Kadriorg, built by the orders of Peter I, the Estonian provincial government building on Toompea and many churches, theatres, banks and schoolhouses date from this period.
The mid-19th was the beginning of rapid industrial development and Tallinn became one of Russia's most important ports.

The 20th Century
February 24, 1918 marked the birth of the independent democratic Estonian republic, with Tallinn as its capital. The national tricolour was hoisted atop Tall Hermann.
During the next two years the Estonians fought against German and Russian forces to secure the independence.
 
     

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